See what WhatsApp, Facebook and Google are doing to fight climate misinformation

See what WhatsApp, Facebook and Google are doing to fight climate misinformation

Using their influence and global reach, the platforms have promoted actions ranging from the dissemination of trusted content to public opinion polls.

The transition to a low-carbon world requires comprehensive measures from governments and companies, but it also requires citizen participation. As an individual, everyone has a role to play in this challenge. Therefore, bringing people closer to the subject and combating disinformation are now a priority.

Faced with this mission, giants like whatsapp, facebook and Google are using their reach and popularity to bring quality content on the topic to their users.

UN message on mobile

Whatsapp is, for example, working with the United Nations (UN) on an automated messaging service that gives practical tips on how each one can help limit the planet warming.

“We want to empower people to make climate action an integral part of their daily lives and be part of the solution,” said Melissa Fleming, UN Under-Secretary-General for Global Communications. “Collaborating with WhatsApp allows us to reach people directly and inspire them to be agents of change.”

In the content of the messages, there is an action guide with ten attitudes that contribute to facing the climate crisis. Users can select an action, learn more about it, share it with friends, and record their contribution.

The partnership forms part of the UN’s ActNow campaign to encourage individual action on climate changes and sustainability. So far, more than 7.7 million individual shares have been registered.

According to the entity, about two thirds of the greenhouse gas emissions are related to people’s homes and lifestyles. “From the electricity we use, to the food we eat and the way we travel, we can make a difference.”

For now, the messaging service is only available in English, but in the coming months other languages ​​will be released. To use, just click on this link.

Google search priority

Google also partnered with the UN this year to bring trusted climate content to its users.

Since June, when someone searches the search engine for “climate change”, the first result is, and prominently, official information from the United Nations in 12 languages, including Portuguese.

“Disinformation is so pervasive these days that it threatens progress and understanding on many core issues, including climate. The need for accurate, science-based information on a subject like climate change to be at the forefront of research, therefore, has never been greater,” said Fleming.

Google search priority

Google also partnered with the UN this year to bring trusted climate content to its users.

Since June, when someone searches the search engine for “climate change”, the first result is, and prominently, official information from the United Nations in 12 languages, including Portuguese.

“Disinformation is so pervasive these days that it threatens progress and understanding on many core issues, including climate. The need for accurate, science-based information on a subject like climate change to be at the forefront of research, therefore, has never been greater,” said Fleming.

Information, research and funding on Facebook

Facebook also announced in the last year a series of measures to raise awareness of the impacts of climate changes and combat disinformation on their platforms.

One is the expansion of its Climate Science Information Center to more than 150 countries. The hub, which connects users with reliable climate information, brings together various content, such as quizzes, explanatory articles, answers to fake news and myths, news from competent bodies, graphs, statistics and tips on how to collaborate.

The social network is also investing $1 million in a grant program, in partnership with the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN), to support organizations working to combat climate misinformation.

Thanks to its global reach, Facebook is also contributing to collecting data on climate issues. In partnership with Yale University, the social network recently conducted a comprehensive global survey of public opinions on climate change.

A sample of nearly 110,000 users of the platform, from 192 countries and territories, were asked about their knowledge, attitudes and behavior towards the topic of climate change and what should be done to deal with this challenge.

Findings can help researchers, journalists, NGOs and decision-makers. “It is hoped that they can be used to inform policy decisions and priorities for governments, especially in many countries where research of this type has not been conducted before,” Facebook said in the release of the results.

Source: Exam

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